All Posts tagged pancreatic cancer

World Cancer Day

World Cancer Day

February 4 is World Cancer Day, which means it is time to talk about cancer. The disease is all around us, yet it lurks in the darkness, a sometimes silent killer. 585,720 people died from cancer in the United States in 2014, with 1,665,540 new cases being diagnosed. Another frightening statistic: 40 percent of people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Many people do not even realize they have cancer until it is too late to be treated effectively.

While cancer certainly seems scary, it is not a death sentence. If caught early enough, most forms of cancer can be treated before they get any worse. Some cancers, such as breast, skin, thyroid, and prostate cancer, have relatively high five year survival rates. In fact, you only have a 0.8 percent chance of dying within five years if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Some forms of cancer are more treacherous, however. Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst survival rates, with only six percent of patients living past the five year mark. Other deadly cancers include lung and brain cancer.

The best defense against this disease is knowledge. You can take steps to lower your risk by eating healthy, exercising, and avoiding known carcinogens. You can also be aware of risk factors and whether or not you are genetically predisposed to be at a higher risk. While there is no guaranteed way to stop cancer, you can still do your best to prevent it.

World Cancer Day

Cancer affects millions of Americans each year, resulting in pain, suffering, and death. Learn more and spread awareness by taking this quiz.

world cancer day awareness quiz

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Gallagher Sports Purple at PurpleStride Pittsburgh

Gallagher Sports Purple at PurpleStride Pittsburgh

You might usually associate Gallagher with an emerald green.  But last Sunday, Gallagher employees were proudly decked out in bright purple.

The organization attended the PurpleStride Pittsburgh 5K in support of pancreatic cancer awareness. Pancreatic cancer has touched our company in a personal way, which means we want to do everything we can to fight against it.

A total of 19 employees along with their family and friends participated in the race, which greatly exceeded the recruitment goal of 10 people.

survivors with dave crawley

Pancreatic survivors were honored at the race.

Additionally, $2,791 dollars were raised by the team, which also exceeded the team goal of $2,750. All proceeds go directly to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, which is dedicated to advance research, support patients, and create hope for those affected by pancreatic cancer.

For more photos from the event, check out Gallagher’s Facebook page.

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PurpleStride Pittsburgh is This Weekend!

PurpleStride Pittsburgh is This Weekend!

PurpleStrideStatisticsThis Sunday, July 13, Gallagher will be participating in the PurpleStride Pittsburgh 5K to benefit pancreatic cancer awareness. And it’s not too late to join us!

Tomorrow, July 8, is the deadline for online registration. Click here to join our team and show your support for those fighting this terrible disease.

If you are unable to make it in person to the event, you can still contribute! It’s easy to donate online, and your gift will make a wonderful impact in the battle against pancreatic cancer. Simply click here to be taken to our secure donation site.

So far, Gallagher is right on track with our fundraising goal! Gallagher had planned to raise $2,400 and has reached $2,296. So far, we have 13 people registered, which is 3 more than our recruitment goal of 10. Thank you to everyone who has supported this cause so far!

The race starts at 9:45 a.m. at the North Shore Riverfront Park.

Pancreatic cancer is a cause very near and dear to the hearts of the Gallagher staff. Of the 45,000 Americans that will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year, more than 39,000 will die from the disease. The five-year survival rate is a grim 6%, which is the worst among all major cancers.

The event benefits the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, which is a nationwide network of people dedicated to “working together to advance research, support patients and create hope for those affected by pancreatic cancer.” Since 2003, the organization has funded $18 million in 94 research grants, served 86,000 people with the Patient and Liaison Services program, and advocated pancreatic cancer research on the federal level.

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Daily Dose of Aspirin May Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Daily Dose of Aspirin May Reduce Pancreatic Cancer Risk

New research suggests that regular aspirin use may reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by half.

The study, which was published by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health, focused on 30 hospitals from across Connecticut between 2005 and 2009. Scientists used 362 pancreatic cancer patients as well as 690 controls.

Each participant took a low-dose of aspirin, between 75 to 325 milligrams, on a daily basis. The results showed that the earlier a person started taking aspirin regularly, the greater their risk for pancreatic cancer was reduced.

Those who had taken the medicine for six years or less had a 39 percent reduced risk of developing the disease. Those who had taken it for more than 10 years had a 60 percent lower risk.

“The thought that there’s something that could lower the risk of someone getting pancreatic cancer is remarkable and exciting to me as a physician who has patients who have gotten — and died from — pancreatic cancer,” said CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook. “There’s very little we can do for most people that get pancreatic cancer.”

Currently, pancreatic cancer has a five year survival rate of only five percent, and claims 40,000 Americans each year. Having a new way of preventing the disease is crucial, since early detection is unlikely to make much difference in lifespan.

However, research on using aspirin as a preventative measure against cancer is still in the early stages. For now, doctors warn that the side effects of taking aspirin, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, are not worth the risk.

“Aspirin is not a risk-free substance,” said Dr. Harvey Risch, a professor of epidemiology who led the research. “If people are already using low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular disease prevention, they can feel good that most likely it’s lowering their risk for pancreatic cancer.”

Scientists are hopeful that aspirin can offer a new route not only for cancer prevention, but for cancer treatment.

 

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Gallagher to Participate in PurpleStride Pittsburgh

Gallagher to Participate in PurpleStride Pittsburgh

Gallagher will be participating in the PurpleStride Pittsburgh 5K walk and run on July 13, 2014. The event is occurring at the North Shore Riverfront Park and benefits pancreatic cancer awareness.

The event benefits the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, which is a nationwide network of people dedicated to “working together to advance research, support patients and create hope for those affected by pancreatic cancer.” Since 2003, the organization has funded $18 million in 94 research grants, served 86,000 people with the Patient and Liaison Services program, and advocated pancreatic cancer research on the federal level.

Pancreatic cancer is a cause very near and dear to the hearts of the Gallagher staff. Of the 45,000 Americans that will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year, more than 39,000 will die from the disease. The five-year survival rate is a grim 6%, which is the worst among all major cancers.

It is because of these foreboding statistics that fundraisers such as these are so important. Gallagher’s goal is to raise at least $500 for the event. If you would like to join the Gallagher team as they strive to support Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, your support would be much appreciated. We are looking for volunteers to help at the event, walkers or runners to participate in the actual race, and sponsors to donate funds.

You may join our team by clicking hereFor a printable flyer with more information about the event, please click here.

 

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